Guide

How many watts do ceiling fans use and ceiling fan wattage chart

A ceiling fan is a great way to keep your home cool and comfortable without using a lot of energy. But how many watts do ceiling fans use? And what are the other benefits of using ceiling fans?

how many watts do ceiling fans use?
how many watts do ceiling fans use?

In this blog post, we’ll answer these questions and more. We’ll also provide tips on how to save energy when using a ceiling fan. Keep reading for more information!

How many watts do ceiling fans use

how many watts do ceiling fans use
how many watts do ceiling fans use

How many watts does a ceiling fan use per hour

Most ceiling fans have a wattage of about 60-80 watts. However, some newer models or higher end fans can use up to 100-120 watts.

How many watts is a normal ceiling fan

how many watts is a normal ceiling fan
how many watts is a normal ceiling fan

A normal ceiling fan has a wattage of around 60-80. This will depend on the model and type of fan, but in general, a smaller wattage fan will be more likely to be used in a bedroom or smaller area, while a larger wattage fan will be more suited for larger areas such as a living room.

To measure the scale of your ceiling fan, you’ll need to first determine the length and width of the blade. Measure both horizontally and vertically from the center of the blade to the edge. Write these measurements down so that you have them ready when measuring the scale of your fan.

Now, take your height and multiply it by 1.5 to get your scale in inches. This is how many inches wide your blade should be at its widest point (excluding ornamentation).

Next, determine how many blades are on your fan by counting from one end of the blade to the other. Most fans have three blades, so this number would be 2 (1 + 1 + 1).

Finally, multiply this number by .075 to get your scale in inches (for example: if there are three blades on your fan and it’s .75 inches wide at its widest point excluding ornamentation, then your scale would be .875 inches wide).

Once you have these numbers handy, it’s time to measure the space where you want to install your new ceiling fan. Take into account any obstructions such as cabinets or walls. Once you have an accurate measurement for where you want your new fan installed, use this information along with the above numbers to find out how many watts your new ceiling fan should have.

Always make sure to follow manufacturer recommendations when it comes to installing or wiring a ceiling fan; failure to do so could lead to serious injury or even death.

With 5 minutes access to ceilingfanswiki.com and stay safe Toby Nwazor recommends watching :

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What is the average wattage consumption of a ceiling fan based on its size?

What is the average wattage consumption of a ceiling fan based on its size?
What is the average wattage consumption of a ceiling fan based on its size?
  •  Small ceiling fans (36″ or smaller in diameter) utilize an average of 47 watts on high, 4.6 watts on low, and 0.8 watts while in standby mode. The average CFM per watt for this group is 54.
  •  Average power consumption for medium-sized ceiling fans (42″ to 48″) is 17.9 watts on high, 3.5 watts on low, and 1 watt in standby. Medium ceiling fans have an average CFM to watt ratio of 251, which is above average.
  • A big ceiling fan (50″ to 54″) uses an average of 23.4 watts on high, 3.6 watts on low, and 0.9 watts while it is in standby mode on average. When comparing huge ceiling fans, the average CFM to watts ratio is 268.
  • Average power consumption for the biggest ceiling fans (from 56″ to 84″) ranges from 34.6 watts on high to 3.6 watts on low and 1.1 watts in standby mode. The average CFM/W for this group is 301.
  • In addition to the size factor, another important influence is the Propeller Material, vibration changes wind speed

Understand more Propeller Material:

Whilst propeller materials in general exhibit low damping for most commercial applications, it is possible to use material with a very high damping if the blade design demands a high level of suppression of the vibration characteristics.

Source: sciencedirect.com

Ceiling fan with Low Wattage

If you are looking for an energy-efficient ceiling fan, a low-wattage model is a great choice. These fans typically have wattages of 60-80 watts, making them a more affordable and efficient option than many other models on the market.

They work well in small to medium-sized rooms, and are ideal for bedrooms or living areas where you want to create a comfortable environment without using too much power.

Ceiling fan with a Medium Wattage

If you have a larger room or you want your ceiling fan to move more air, a medium-wattage model is a good choice. These fans typically use 80-100 watts, making them more powerful than low-wattage models without sacrificing too much in terms of energy efficiency.

They work well in medium to large-sized rooms and can be used in any space where you need a little extra cooling power.

Ceiling fan with a High Wattage

If you want the strongest and most powerful ceiling fan for your home, a high-wattage model may be the best option. These fans typically use 100-120 watts, making them ideal for large rooms or spaces where you need maximum airflow.

While they do use more energy than other models, they are still a great choice if you want the most cooling power possible from your ceiling fan.

Ceiling fan wattage chart

When purchasing a new ceiling fan, it is important to know the wattage that the fan will require to operate. To measure the wattage of a fan, you can use a wattage chart. This chart will list the wattage required to run the fan at different speeds. Once you have determined the wattage needed, you can purchase a fan that meets or exceeds this requirement.

Ceiling fan wattage chart,according to fan size, the wattage of ceiling fans is broken down in the table below, along with the average CFM/W.

Ceiling Fan Size Avg On High Avg On Low Avg On Standby Avg Efficiency (CFM/W)
Small (36″ or less) 47W 4.6W 0.8W 54
Medium (42″ to 48″) 17.9W 3.5W 1.0W 251
Large (50″ to 54″) 23.4W 3.6W 0.9W 268
Largest (56″ to 84″) 34.6W 3.6W 1.1W 301

What is the energy consumption of a ceiling fan in kilowatt hours (KWh)?

When referring to power usage, many people use the term wattage, whereas others use the term kilowatt-hour (kWh). Electricity companies bill customers on a per-kilowatt-hour basis.

What is the energy consumption of a ceiling fan in kilowatt hours (KWh)?
What is the energy consumption of a ceiling fan in kilowatt hours (KWh)?

So let’s take a look at ceiling fan kWh for the sake of simplicity.

kWh = Ceiling Fan Wattage x Duration of Use (hrs) / 1,000

Ceiling Fan Size Per Hour Per Night (8hrs) Per Day (24hrs) Per Week (on 24/7) Per Month (on 24/7 for 30 days)
Medium (42″ to 48″) 0.018kWh 0.143kWh 0.43kWh 3.01kWh 12.91kWh
Large (50″ to 54″) 0.023kWh 0.187kWh 0.56kWh 3.93kWh 16.85kWh
Largest (56″ to 84″) 0.035kWh 0.277kWh 0.83kWh 5.81kWh 24.92kWh
  • Medium-sized ceiling fans (42″ to 48″) consume an average of 0.018kWh of power per hour on a continuous basis.
  • Medium-sized ceiling fans consume 0.43kWh of power per day, 3.01kWh per week, and 12.91kWh per month on average if they are left on 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Large ceiling fans (50″ to 54″) utilize an average of 0.023kWh of power per hour on average.
  • If large ceiling fans are left running 24 hours a day, they use 0.56kWh of power per day, 3.93kWh per week, and 16.85kWh per month on average.

How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan?

How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan?
How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan?

To calculate your power use in kWh, multiply it by the amount you pay your electricity supplier per unit / kWh of electricity consumed.

The fact that this has occurred is generally indicated on your statement.

Ceiling Fan Size Cost Per Hour (15c/kWh) Per Night / 8hrs (15c/kWh) Per Day / 24hrs (15c/kWh) Per Week On 24/7 (15c/kWh) Per Month On 24/7 for 30 Days (15c/kWh)
Medium (42″ to 48″) $0.003 $0.022 $0.065 $0.45 $1.94
Large (50″ to 54″) $0.004 $0.028 $0.084 $0.59 $2.53
Largest (56″ to 84″) $0.005 $0.042 $0.125 $0.87 $3.74

In the United States, the average cost of running a medium-sized ceiling fan is.003 cents per hour. This equates to little more than 2 cents each night / 8 hours.

In the United States, on average, a medium-sized ceiling fan costs 6.5 cents per day, 45 cents per week, and $1.94 cents a month to run if it is left on all of the time.

The operating costs of bigger fans are somewhat higher than those of smaller ones.

To operate a big ceiling fan (50″ to 54″) in the United States costs on average.004 cents per hour. Expect the operating expenses to be close to 3 cents every night (or 8-hour period).

Keeping a huge ceiling fan running around the clock costs on average slightly over 8 cents per day, 59 cents per week, and $2.53 per month in the United States.

Is a ceiling fan efficient in terms of electricity consumption?

Is a ceiling fan efficient in terms of electricity consumption?
Is a ceiling fan efficient in terms of electricity consumption?

The wattage of a ceiling fan will impact its efficiency in terms of electricity consumption. Low-wattage models are typically more efficient, while high-wattage models use more power.

However, the overall efficiency of a ceiling fan depends on several factors, including the size of the room, the speed at which the fan is running, and how often it is used.

Do ceiling fans consume a significant amount of electricity?

Do ceiling fans consume a significant amount of electricity?
Do ceiling fans consume a significant amount of electricity?

Some ceiling fans may consume a significant amount of electricity, depending on their wattage and the size of the room they are being used in. Low-wattage models typically use less power than high-wattage models, while larger rooms may require more power to effectively create airflow.

Additionally, the speed at which a fan is running can impact its overall energy consumption, as well as how often it is being used. Overall, choosing an efficient ceiling fan that fits your needs will help to minimize your electricity usage and keep your energy costs down.

Ceiling fan CFM – the most energy efficient type of ceiling fan:

Ceiling fan CFM - the most energy efficient type of ceiling fan
Ceiling fan CFM – the most energy efficient type of ceiling fan

What is CFM?

It stands for cubic feet per minute and it’s a measure of how much air a ceiling fan can move. One of the main benefits of CFM is that it determines how efficient a ceiling fan will be at moving air around your home.

According to the findings of a survey of 195 of the top ceiling fans available on the market, the average ceiling fan CFM/W is 287.8.

CFM (Cubic Feet Per Minute) of Ceiling Fans Comparison

Size (inches) Avg Efficiency (CFM/W) Most Efficient (CFM/W) Most Efficient Model
19″ – 25″ 60.1 60.1 ARTIKA – FAN-SUR-SL
34″ 47.4 47.4 Kichler Lighting – 330150***
42″ 61.6 61.6 Emerson – CF804S-2
43″ 291.0 316 AERATRON – AE2+43
44″ 236.4 256 Big Ass Fans – FR112C-U1H
48″ 259.0 259 Fanimation – MAD8514*
50″ 299.0 357 AERATRON – AE2+50LED
52″ 255.0 344.9 RP Lighting & Fans – 1055
54″ 307.4 374.4 Emerson – CF955L
56″ 249.0 319 Monte Carlo – 3TAR56***D
60″ 285.7 409 AERATRON – AE2+60
62″ 242.0 264 Craftmade – SAP62***5
64″ 299.6 328 Fanimation – MAD8515*
65″ 244.0 244 Minka Aire – F870L
66″ 299.7 320 WAC Lighting – F-064
68″ 353.6 407 Home Decorators Collection – 68-ATRDC
70″ 298.1 337 Monte Carlo – 3MAVR70**D
72″ 320.3 385 Monte Carlo – 8KGR72
80″ 295.0 295 RP Lighting & Fans – 1080W
84″ 336.8 444 Fanimation – MAD7997*

Ceiling Fan with the Highest Energy Efficiency

The Monte Carlo – 5VMR84***D, an 84-inch indoor-only ceiling fan with a CFM/W of 431 is the most energy-efficient ceiling fan available.

Ceiling Fan Size Avg Efficiency (CFM/W) Most Efficient Model Most Efficient CFM/W
Small (36″ or less) 53.8 ARTIKA – FAN-SUR-SL 60.1
Medium (42″ to 48″) 251 AERATRON – AE2+43 316
Large (50″ to 54″) 267.6 Emerson – CF955L 374.4

These are both 84″ fans, which means that they are likely to be too large for most houses — they are both in the “Largest” size group, after all.

Electricity consumption of ceiling fans compared to that of air conditioners:

Electricity consumption of ceiling fans compared to that of air conditioners
Electricity consumption of ceiling fans compared to that of air conditioners

 

While ceiling fans use less power than air conditioners, they are not as efficient in terms of electricity consumption. Air conditioners typically have a higher wattage than ceiling fans, which means they use more power.

Additionally, air conditioners tend to be used more often than ceiling fans, as they are generally needed in hot weather when the temperature is unbearable. However, ceiling fans can be a more energy-efficient option if they are used sparingly and only when necessary.

Electricity consumption of a ceiling fan vs a standing fan:

Electricity consumption of a ceiling fan vs a standing fan
Electricity consumption of a ceiling fan vs a standing fan

The power consumption of ceiling fans is on average lower than that of standing fans.

The average ceiling fan uses 31.1 watts of electricity, and the average standing fan consumes 42.5 watts of electricity.

Standing Fan Size Average Wattage Ceiling Fan Size Average Wattage
Small (4″ – 6.9″) 28.5W Small (36″ or less) 47W
Medium (7″ – 9.9″) 52.7W Medium (42″ to 48″) 17.9W
Large (10″ +) 44.3W Large (50″ to 54″) 23.4W
All sizes 42.5W All sizes 31.1W
  • Compared to tiny ceiling fans, which have an average wattage of 47W, small standing fans have an average wattage of 28.5W.
  • Medium-sized ceiling fans use an average of 17.9 watts, whereas medium-sized standing fans consume an average of 52.7 watts.
  • Huge ceiling fans use an average of 23.4 watts, but large standing fans consume an average of 44.3 watts.

How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan vs. a stand up fan:

How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan vs. a stand up fan?
How much does it cost to run a ceiling fan vs. a stand up fan?

Stand-alone fans have a somewhat higher operating cost than ceiling fans on average. Only one tenth of a penny separates the two outcomes.

Standing Fan Size Cost P/H (15 cents/kWh) Ceiling Fan Size Cost P/H (15 cents/kWh)
Small (4″ – 6.9″) $0.004 Small (36″ or less) $0.007
Medium (7″ – 9.9″) $0.008 Medium (42″ to 48″) $0.003
Large (10″ +) $0.007 Large (50″ to 54″) $0.004
All sizes $0.006 All sizes $0.005

F.A.Q how many watts do ceiling fans use?

What is the power consumption of a 52-inch ceiling fan?

A power of 90 watts.
The amount of energy used by a ceiling fan is determined by the fan’s size. A fan with blades of 36 inches in length consumes around 55 watts.

Fan blades with a diameter of 48 inches normally use 75 watts, whereas fan blades with a diameter of 52 inches often consume 90 watts.

What is the power consumption of ceiling fan lights in watts?

Ceiling fans use between 10 and 120 watts of power; air conditioners, on the other hand, might consume between 750 and 3,500 watts.

What is the power consumption of a huge ceiling fan?

Ceiling fans are available in a variety of sizes, ranging from extraordinarily small fans with maximum power of 20-30 watts to big ones with maximum power of 100+ watts. Many Energy Star certified fans have a maximum power of less than 30-40 watts, but such equipment, particularly the larger ones, are a tad on the expensive side.

In a 24-hour period, how much power does a ceiling fan use?

To summarize, it is appropriate to state that fans are very energy efficient. An average-sized ceiling fan has a rated power of 70 watts and uses 0.84 kWh of energy in 12 hours of operation, which corresponds to less than Rs 12 in your electricity bill.

Conclusion:

Ceiling fans are a great way to save energy and keep your home comfortable.

In the summer, they can help cool down a room by circulating air around the space. In the winter, they can help circulate warm air from your furnace or heating system throughout the house.

By understanding how many watts different ceiling fans use, you can choose one that is most efficient for your needs.

Toby Nwazor

Toby Nwazor is a serial entrepreneur, a success coach, a business development consultant, a strategist, a motivational speaker, and a freelance writer. He writes on other cool platforms like Entrepreneur magazine, Success.com, Good Men Project, and Business 2 Community and author of website articles Ceilingfanswiki.com . He is the founder of My Startup CEO where he gives kick-ass motivation and provides helpful tips for start-up business success. Follow him on Twitter, and Like MSC on Facebook

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